Norsok Z 015 Temporary Equipment Assignment

GUIDELINES REGARDING THE FACILITIES REGULATIONS

(Last updated 18 December 2017)

Petroleum Safety Authority Norway

Norwegian Environment Agency

Norwegian Directorate of Health

Norwegian Food Safety Authority

Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority

Guidelines regarding the facilities regulations

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY PROVISIONS. 5

Re Section 1 Scope. 5

Re Section 2 Responsibilities5

Re Section 3 Definitions5

CHAPTER II GENERAL PROVISIONS. 6

Re Section 4 Choice of development concept6

Re Section 5 Design of facilities6

Re Section 6 Design of simpler facilities without accommodation. 7

Re Section 7 Main safety functions7

Re Section 8 Safety functions7

CHAPTER III OVERALL JOINT REQUIREMENTS. 8

Re Section 9 Qualification and use of new technology and new methods8

Re Section 10 Installations, systems and equipment8

Re Section 10a Ignition source control9

Re Section 11 Loads/actions, load/action effects and resistance. 9

Re Section 12 Materials10

Re Section 13 Materials handling and transport routes, access and evacuation routes11

Re Section 14 Ventilation and indoor climate. 12

Re Section 15 Chemicals and chemical exposure. 12

Re Section 16 (This section has been repealed)13

Re Section 17 Instrumentation for monitoring and registration. 13

Re Section 18 Systems for internal and external communication. 13

Re Section 19 Communication equipment14

CHAPTER IV DESIGN OF WORK AND COMMON AREAS. 14

Re Section 20 Ergonomic design. 14

Re Section 21 Human-machine interface and information presentation. 15

Re Section 22 Outdoor work areas15

Re Section 23 Noise and acoustics15

Re Section 24 Vibrations16

Re Section 25 Lighting. 16

Re Section 26 Radiation. 16

Re Section 27 Personnel transport equipment17

Re Section 28 Safety signs17

CHAPTER V PHYSICAL BARRIERS. 17

Re Section 29 Passive fire protection. 17

Re Section 30 Fire divisions17

Re Section 31 Fire divisions in living quarters18

Re Section 32 Fire and gas detection systems18

Re Section 33 Emergency shutdown system.. 19

Re Section 34 Process safety system.. 19

Re Section 34a Control and monitoring system.. 20

Re Section 35 Gas release system.. 20

Re Section 36 Firewater supply. 20

Re Section 37 Fixed fire-fighting systems21

Re Section 38 Emergency power and emergency lighting. 21

Re Section 39 Ballast system.. 22

Re Section 40 Open drainage systems22

CHAPTER VI EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS. 22

Re Section 41 Equipment for rescue of personnel22

Re Section 41a Evacuation and rescue means for manned underwater operations22

Section 42 Materials for action against acute pollution. 23

Re Section 43 Emergency preparedness vessels23

Re Section 44 Means of evacuation. 23

Re Section 45 Rescue suits and life jackets, etc.23

Re Section 46 Manual fire-fighting and firefighters’ equipment24

CHAPTER VII ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS. 24

Re Section 47 Electrical installations24

CHAPTER VIII DRILLING AND WELL SYSTEMS. 25

Re Section 48 Well barriers25

Re Section 49 Well control equipment25

Re Section 50 Compensator and disconnection systems26

Re Section 51 Drilling fluid system.. 26

Re Section 52 Cementing unit27

Re Section 53 Equipment for completion and well flow.. 27

Re Section 54 Christmas tree and wellhead. 27

CHAPTER IX PRODUCTION PLANTS. 28

Re Section 55 Production facility. 28

CHAPTER X LOAD-BEARING STRUCTURES AND PIPELINE SYSTEMS. 28

Re Section 56 Load-bearing structures and maritime systems28

Re Section 57 Pipeline systems29

CHAPTER XI LIVING QUARTERS. 29

Re Section 58 Living quarters29

Re Section 59 Health department30

Re Section 60 Emergency sickbay. 30

Re Section 61 Supply of food and drinking water30

CHAPTER XII MARITIME FACILITIES. 30

Re Section 62 Stability. 30

Re Section 63 Anchoring and positioning. 31

Re Section 64 Turrets31

CHAPTER XIII DIVING FACILITIES. 31

Re Section 65 Facilities and equipment for manned underwater operations31

CHAPTER XIV ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS. 31

Re Section 66 Loading and offloading systems31

Re Section 67 Waste. 32

Re Section 68 Exhaust ducts32

Re Section 69 Lifting appliances and lifting gear32

Re Section 70 Helicopter deck. 32

Re Section 71 Marking of facilities33

Re Section 72 Marking of equipment and cargo. 33

Re Section 73 Lifts33

CHAPTER XV IMPLEMENTATION OF EEA REGULATIONS. 33

Re Section 74 Simple pressure vessels33

Re Section 75 Personal protective equipment33

Re Section 76 Aerosol containers33

Re Section 77 EMC. 34

Re Section 78 ATEX.. 34

Re Section 79 Pressure equipment that is not covered by the Facilities Regulations34

Re Section 80 Products that are not covered by the Facilities Regulations34

CHAPTER XVI CONCLUDING PROVISIONS. 35

Re Section 81 Supervision, decisions, enforcement, etc.35

Re Section 82 Entry into force. 35

LIST OF REFERENCES. 36


CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTORY PROVISIONS

Re Section 1
Scope

The scope of these regulations has been limited compared with the Framework Regulations, so that they only apply to offshore petroleum activities.

The second subsection makes individual requirements in these regulations applicable also for installations and equipment for conducting manned underwater operations from vessels.

For comments to the third subsection of this section, see the guidelines regarding Section 3 of the Framework Regulations.

To regulations

Re Section 2
Responsibilities

No comments.

To regulations

Re Section 3
Definitions

Definitions and abbreviations set out in the Framework Regulations are not repeated in these regulations. These guidelines explain or provide supplementary information to definitions as listed in this section.

Fire divisions – Classes A and H:

The ISO 834 standard should be used for standardised fire tests.

Dimensioning accidental load/action:

The dimensioning accidental load/action is typically established as part of a risk assessment as the load/action that occurs with an annual likelihood greater than or equal to 1x10-4.

Design load/action:

The design load/action can be the same as the dimensioning accidental load/action, but it can be more conservative as well, based on different input and assessments such as ALARP, minimum requirements in the regulations etc. In practice, this may entail that the design accidental load/action must be given a higher value than the dimensioning accidental load/action. As a minimum, the design accidental load/action must always correspond to the dimensioning accidental load/action.

Simpler facilities without accommodation:

Integrated development concept as mentioned under simpler facilities without accommodation litera c, means facilities with gangway connections. The simpler facility can, however, be connected to other facilities through a pipeline system.

Not constituting a danger to other facilities as mentioned under simpler facilities without accommodation litera c, includes the meaning that fire on the facility does not jeopardise the safety of other facilities, e.g. through the possibility of the fire spreading or thermal stress.

Main area:

Main areas can be the

a)      living quarter

b)     auxiliary equipment area

c)      drilling area

d)     wellhead area

e)      process area

f)      storage area for hydrocarbons

Pipeline systems:

Fluids mean liquids and gases.

On a subsea facility, the subsea pipeline normally terminates at the connection to a christmas tree or wing valve. The christmas tree is not considered part of the pipeline system.

On a subsea facility where the above definition cannot be applied, the subsea pipeline ends at the connection to the subsea facility. The connection piece is part of the subsea pipeline.

Subsea pipelines and risers up to and including the chamber for launching or receiving tools for internal maintenance (including inspection), with associated equipment, are considered to belong to the pipeline system. If such a chamber has not been installed, the pipeline system is considered to extend to the first automatic shutdown valve above water.

To regulations

CHAPTER II
GENERAL PROVISIONS

Re Section 4
Choice of development concept

The following should be taken into account when choosing a development concept:

litera a:important risk contributors, cf. Section 4 and 17 of the Management Regulations,

litera b:organisation, staffing, maintenance, transport solution, working environment, any manned underwater operations,

litera c:operational discharges and emissions, cf. Sections 4 and 17 of the Management Regulations and applicable objectives (cf. Storting White Paper 25 (2002-2003) The Government's environmental policy and the state of the environment in Norway) relating to reduction of emissions and discharges,

litera d:infrastructure, other fields and facilities, distance to land and bases, fishery activities and shipping lanes,

litera e:route, sea depth, seabed conditions, wave height, wind and other natural conditions,

litera f:recovery rate, pressure, temperature, oil or gas, corrosiveness and shallow gas,

litera g:delivery obligations and economy,

litera h:flexibility and expected changes in operating conditions, as well as future use,

litera i:removal and reuse.

The need to qualify new technology should also be taken into account, cf. Section 9.

To regulations

Re Section 5
Design of facilities

For general requirements related to risk reduction, see Section 11 of the Framework Regulations and Chapters II and V of the Management Regulations.

To fulfil the design requirements as mentioned in the first subsection, the standards NS-EN ISO 13702 with appendices, NORSOK S-001 and S-002 should be used for the health and safety sections. For lifting equipment, the NORSOK R-002 standard should be used.

For mobile facilities that are not production facilities and that are registered in a national shipping register, DNVGL-OS-A101 can be used as an alternative in the area covered by the standard.

In order to fulfil the strategy requirement as mentioned in the third subsection, the principles in the NS-EN ISO 13702 standard should be used for all hazard and accident situations.

In order to fulfil the requirements for design and siting referred to in the fourth subsection, the facility should be designed so that the potential for and consequences of accidents are reduced. Areas, equipment and functions should be arranged, sited and organised so as to, as far as possible:

a)restrict the potential for the accumulation and spread of hazardous materials,

b)restrict the potential for ignition,

c)separate areas containing hazardous materials from each other and from other areas and

d)reduce potential consequences of and the potential for escalation in the event of fire and explosion.

For classification of areas at risk of explosion as mentioned in the fifth subsection, the IEC 61892-7 standard should be used.

Area requirements as mentioned in the sixth subsection, can be fulfilled through both technical and operational measures.

For the design of the area for storing items as mentioned in the seventh subsection, the regulations on hazardous substances (in Norwegian only), the regulations on explosive materials (in Norwegian only) and Chapter 5.4.7 of the NORSOK S-001 standard should be used. For manned underwater operations, Chapter 7.6 of the NORSOK U-100N standard should be used in addition.

In the eighth subsection, facilitation means that it is practicable to make such a system available for use on the facility. This means, amongst other, that the facility is spatially and structurally suited for the siting of such a system, including in respect of weight and other loads/actions. Alternatively, access to necessary pumping and fluid capacity may be arranged by other means. The requirement in the eighth subsection entails that necessary pumping and fluid capacity must be operationally available within a period of time that is considered prudent for assuring the function that the system is to have.

To regulations

Re Section 6
Design of simpler facilities without accommodation

Specific assessments as mentioned in the second subsection, mean assessments of the overall risk for all activities related to operation and maintenance of the facilities, including transport of employees.

Examples of specific solutions as mentioned in the second subsection, are Sections 14, 32, 37, 41 and 44.

Examples of sections where simpler solutions can be considered than those indicated in the guidelines as mentioned in the third subsection, are Sections 20, 25 and 45.

To regulations

Re Section 7
Main safety functions

The main safety functions as mentioned in the first subsection, should be designed on the basis of each facility's characteristics. The main safety functions that shall be intact both during and after an accident situation, should be indicated.

The requirement regarding maintenance of main safety functions as mentioned in literas a and e, applies for the time until the areas outside of the immediate vicinity of the accident site have been evacuated, including the time it takes to carry out the search and rescue efforts in these areas.

The requirement regarding maintenance of main safety functions as mentioned in literas b, c and d, applies to the time until the facility has been evacuated, including the time it takes to carry out search and rescue efforts.

To regulations

Re Section 8
Safety functions

Safety functions as mentioned in the first subsection, are included as barriers against hazard and accident situations as mentioned in Section 5, and Sections 4 and 5 of the Management Regulations.

Safety functions can be divided into active and passive functions.

The design of active safety functions as mentioned in the first subsection, should be based on the standards NORSOK S-001, NS-EN ISO 13702, IEC 61508 and ISO 13849. The Norwegian Oil and Gas’ Guideline No. 070 should be used in addition.

To ensure that the active safety functions are always able to function as mentioned in the first subsection, they should be designed so that they can be tested and maintained without impairing the performance. For disconnection of safety functions, see Section 26 of the Activities Regulations.

In order to stipulate the performance for the safety functions as mentioned in the second subsection, the IEC 61508 standard and Norwegian Oil and Gas’ Guideline No. 070 should be used where electrical, electronic and programmable electronic systems are used in the structure of the functions.

In order to fulfil the requirement for available status as mentioned in the third subsection, the NORSOK I- 002 standard, Chapter 4 should be used.

To regulations

CHAPTER III
OVERALL JOINT REQUIREMENTS

Re Section 9
Qualification and use of new technology and new methods

New technology as mentioned in the first subsection, may be new products, analysis tools or known products used in a new way.

The qualification as mentioned in the second subsection, includes investigation and obtaining objective proof that the needs for a specific intended use are covered, cf. Section 21 of the Management Regulations.

The methodology, procedures and equipment used in connection with the qualification, should also be used in the further work.

DNV RP-A203 Qualification Procedures for New Technology can be used to fulfil the requirements regarding methods for the qualification of new technology.

To regulations

Re Section 10
Installations, systems and equipment

Regulations laid down by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs 6 December 2011, pursuant to the Working Environment Act, and entering into force 1 January 2013, including Regulations relating to conduct of work, use of work equipment and appurtenant technical requirements (Conduct of Work Regulations), contain further provisions on certain types of work equipment which is also used in the petroleum activities. Clarification of the scope is directly evident from the individual regulations. In addition, reference is made to the lawmirror (in Norwegian only) of the Norwegian Labour Inspection Authority, in which the requirement of the regulations that are being repealed upon entering into force of the new regulations in pursuance of the Working Environment Act, are included.

With regard to the design of installations, systems and equipment, the following standards should be used in the area of health, working environment and safety:

a)NORSOK D-001 and D-002 for facilities used in drilling and well activities,

b)NORSOK L-002 and L-004 for pipes and valves,

c)NORSOK P-002 for process facilities,

d)NORSOK R-001 for mechanical equipment,

e)NORSOK R-002 for lifting equipment,

f)NORSOK S-005 for machines,

g)NORSOK Z-015 for temporary equipment,

h)NORSOK U-100 and U-101 for diving facilities and breathing equipment,

i)NORSOK U-001 and ISO 13628 for subsea facilities,

j)IMCA/AODC 035 for electrical installations for use under water,

k)IEC 61892 for electrical installations and electrical equipment,

l)NS-EN ISO 11064 as regards human error.

The NS-EN ISO 20815

GUIDELINES REGARDING THE ACTIVITIES REGULATIONS

(Last updated 18 December 2017)

Petroleum Safety Authority Norway

Norwegian Environment Agency

Norwegian Directorate of Health

Norwegian Food Safety Authority

Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority


Guidelines regarding the activities regulations

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY PROVISIONS. 5

Re Section 1 Scope. 5

Re Section 2 Responsibilities5

Re Section 3 Definitions5

CHAPTER II ARRANGEMENTS PURSUANT TO THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT ACT. 5

Re Section 4 Coordinating working environment committees for fields, and joint, local working environment committees for mobile facilities5

Re Section 5 Occupational health service. 6

Re Section 6 Medical examinations for employees6

Re Section 7 Registration of working hours7

CHAPTER III HEALTH RELATED MATTERS. 7

Re Section 8 The health service. 7

Re Section 9 The health service's tasks7

Re Section 10 Physician on-call8

Re Section 11 Medicines and medical equipment8

Re Section 12 Communicable diseases8

Re Section 13 Food and drinking water8

Re Section 14 Cleaning. 9

CHAPTER IV PRELIMINARY SURVEYS AND INSTALLATION.. 9

Re Section 15 Preliminary surveys9

Re Section 16 Installation and commissioning. 9

CHAPTER V TRANSPORT AND STAY.. 10

Re Section 17 Transport10

Re Section 18 Stay on facilities10

Re Section 19 Accommodation and cabin sharing. 10

CHAPTER VI OPERATIONAL PREREQUISITES FOR START-UP AND USE. 10

Re Section 20 Start-up and operation of facilities10

Re Section 21 Competence. 11

Re Section 22 Safety and working environment training pursuant to the Working Environment Act12

Re Section 23 Training and drills13

Re Section 24 Procedures13

Re Section 25 Use of facilities13

Re Section 26 Safety systems14

Re Section 27 Critical activities14

Re Section 28 Simultaneous activities14

CHAPTER VII PLANNING AND EXECUTION.. 15

Re Section 29 Planning. 15

Re Section 29a Storage, handling and use of explosives15

Re Section 30 Safety clearance of activities15

Re Section 31 Monitoring and control16

Re Section 32 Transfer of information at shift and crew changes16

CHAPTER VIII WORKING ENVIRONMENT FACTORS. 16

Re Section 33 Organisation of work. 16

Re Section 34 Ergonomic aspects17

Re Section 35 Psychosocial aspects17

Re Section 36 Chemical health hazard. 17

Re Section 37 Radiation. 18

Re Section 38 Noise. 18

Re Section 39 Vibrations18

Re Section 40 Outdoor work. 19

Re Section 41 Safety signs and signalling in the workplace. 19

Re Section 42 Personal protective equipment19

Re Section 43 Use of work equipment19

Re Section 44 Risk information during execution of work. 19

CHAPTER IX MAINTENANCE. 19

Re Section 45 Maintenance. 19

Re Section 46 Classification. 20

Re Section 47 Maintenance programme. 20

Re Section 48 Planning and priorities20

Re Section 49 Maintenance effectiveness21

Re Section 50 Special requirements for technical condition monitoring of structures, maritime systems and pipeline systems21

Re Section 51 Specific requirements for testing of blow out preventer and other pressure control equipment21

CHAPTER X MONITORING THE EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT. 21

Re Section 52 General requirements to environmental monitoring. 21

Re Section 53 Baseline surveys22

Re Section 54 Environmental monitoring of benthic habitats23

Re Section 55 Environmental monitoring of the water column. 23

Re Section 56 Follow-up of monitoring results24

Re Section 57 Detection and mapping of acute pollution (remote sensing system)24

Re Section 58 Environmental surveys in the event of acute pollution. 24

Re Section 59 Characterisation of oil and condensate. 25

Re Section 59a Analysis of radioactivity in formation water25

CHAPTER XI EMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES TO THE EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT. 25

Re Section 60 Discharge of produced water25

Re Section 60a Discharge of drainage water and other oily water27

Re Section 60b Discharge of oily displacement water27

Re Section 61 Emissions to air27

Re Section 61a Energy management28

Re Section 61b Energy efficiency. 28

Re Section 62 Ecotoxicological testing of chemicals28

Re Section 63 Categorisation of substances and chemicals30

Re Section 64 Environmental assessments of chemicals31

Re Section 65 Choice of chemicals31

Re Section 66 Use and discharge of chemicals31

Re Section 66a Use and discharge of radioactive trace elements32

Re Section 67 Chemicals for emergency preparedness32

Re Section 68 Discharge of cuttings, sand and solid particles32

Re Section 69 Discharge from formation testing and clean-up of wells33

Re Section 70 Measuring the quantity of discharged oil, other substances and water33

Re Section 70a Measuring the discharged amount of radioactive substances33

Re Section 71 Measuring associated fluids discharged with solids33

CHAPTER XII WASTE. 33

Re Section 72 Waste. 33

CHAPTER XIII EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS. 34

Re Section 73 Establishment of emergency preparedness34

Re Section 74 Shared use of emergency preparedness resources34

Re Section 75 Emergency preparedness organisation. 35

Re Section 76 Emergency preparedness plans35

Re Section 77 Handling of hazard and accident situations36

Re Section 78 Collaboration on preparedness against acute pollution. 36

Re Section 79 Action against acute pollution. 37

CHAPTER XIV COMMUNICATION.. 37

Re Section 80 Communication. 37

CHAPTER XV DRILLING AND WELL ACTIVITIES. 38

Re Section 81 Well programme. 38

Re Section 82 Well location and wellbore. 38

Re Section 83 Shallow gas and shallow formation fluids38

Re Section 84 Monitoring well parameters38

Re Section 85 Well barriers39

Re Section 86 Well control39

Re Section 87 Controlled well stream.. 39

Re Section 88 Securing wells40

Re Section 89 Remote operation of pipes and work strings40

CHAPTER XVI MARITIME OPERATIONS. 40

Re Section 90 Positioning. 40

CHAPTER XVII ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS. 42

Re Section 91 Work on and operation of electrical installations42

CHAPTER XVIII LIFTING OPERATIONS. 43

Re Section 92 Lifting operations43

CHAPTER XIX MANNED UNDERWATER OPERATIONS. 43

Re Section 93 Manned underwater operations43

Re Section 94 Time limit provisions43

CHAPTER XX CONCLUDING PROVISIONS. 43

Re Section 95 Supervision, decisions, enforcement, etc.43

Re Section 96 Entry into force. 43

REFERENCE LIST. 44


CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTORY PROVISIONS

Re Section 1
Scope

The scope of the regulations is limited in comparison with the scope of the Framework Regulations, so that they only apply to offshore petroleum activities.

The provision in the second subsection makes individual requirements in these regulations applicable also for facilities and equipment for conduct of manned underwater operations from vessels. For practical reasons, a choice has been made to have a general section on this, rather than repeating it in the individual provisions.

To regulations

Re Section 2
Responsibilities

No comments.

To regulations

Re Section 3
Definitions

No comments.

To regulations

CHAPTER II
ARRANGEMENTS PURSUANT TO THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT ACT

Re Section 4
Coordinating working environment committees for fields, and joint, local working environment committees for mobile facilities

The purpose of joint working environment committees is to ensure coordination of the individual enterprises’ safety and environment work and to give all employees a genuine opportunity of taking part in and influencing the safety and environment work at their own workplace, regardless of their employment relationship. Reference is made to Section 7-2 of the Working Environment Act and provisions on safety delegates in Regulations 6 December 2011 relating to organisation, management and participation (in Norwegian only). These regulations also apply directly to the petroleum activities, with the specifications and limitations given in the regulations.

The duty to establish joint working environment committees does not reduce the duty of the individual employer to establish a working environment committee at its own enterprise, cf. Section 34 of the Framework Regulations. The joint working environment committee will be superior to the working environment committees of the individual enterprises in matters related to the jurisdiction of the joint working environment committee.

The term "field" is continued in the new regulations, inter alia to ensure delimitation of the areas that naturally form an entity for such co-ordination.

Coordinating working environment committees for fields as mentioned in the first subsection, should be limited organisationally to ensure representation of all main activity areas, familiarity with the local conditions at the workplace and proximity to the work of the committee. If agreement cannot be reached among the operator, the contractors in the various main activity areas and the safety delegates as to establishing a coordinating working environment committee that comprises more than one field, cf. the requirement regarding general agreement as mentioned in the first subsection, one of the parties can submit the issue to the Petroleum Safety Authority Norway; which, after having considered all aspects of the matter, can decide if such a working environment committee is to be established.

The coordinating working environment committee should set up subcommittees for the individual facilities when the committee encompasses several facilities, cf. Regulations 6 December 2011 relating to organisation, management and participation (in Norwegian only). These regulations also apply directly to the petroleum activities, with the specifications and limitations given in the regulations.

The main activity areas mentioned in the second section, include drilling, well service, catering, construction, maintenance and production. What is to be considered as main activity areas, will depend on the actual activity on the various facilities.

In order to fulfil the requirement for participation as mentioned in the second subsection, the representatives should come from the principal undertaking and from the largest contractors in the various main activity areas. The employees' representatives should be elected by and among the safety delegates and main safety delegates for the various main activity areas. Two or more trade unions that together organise the majority of the employees in a main activity area can agree that the election will take place as a proportionate representation election or that these trade unions will appoint the employees' representatives for the area, cf. Regulations 6 December 2011 relating to organisation, management and participation (in Norwegian only). These regulations also apply directly to the petroleum activities, with the specifications and limitations given in the regulations. The coordinating working environment committee for the field should have at least one employee representative from each manned facility on the field. The operator's representative on a mobile facility can have status either as an observer or as a representative with voting rights. On the joint, local working environment committee on mobile facilities, a representative of the operator can represent the employer side for contractors that have been hired by the operator.

Coordination as mentioned in the last subsection, means coordination of safety and environment-related matters that are of significance for both mobile and permanently placed facilities on the field.

To regulations

Re Section 5
Occupational health service

Reference is made to Section 3-3 of the Working Environment Act as regards occupational health services. The new Working Environment Act does not have the same requirements related to safety personnel as earlier versions. However, there remains a need for safety personnel in the offshore petroleum activities, and these are defined as part of the occupational health service. The occupational health service shall be approved by the Norwegian Labour Inspection Authority and shall have a free and independent position in working environment matters, cf. Section 3-3, first and third subsections of the Working Environment Act.

As far as the employers use of occupational health service is concerned, reference is, inter alia, also made to provisions on occupational health service in Regulations 6 December 2011 relating to administrative schemes (in Norwegian only) and Regulations 6 December 2011 relating to organisation, management and participation (in Norwegian only). These regulations also apply directly to the petroleum activities, with the specifications and limitations given in the regulations.

In order to fulfil the requirement for cooperation as mentioned in the second subsection, the operator or the party responsible for the operation of a facility, shall enter into agreements with the principal undertaking and the employers of the contractor employees regarding distribution of the working environment tasks carried out by the occupational health service on the facility.

To regulations

Re Section 6
Medical examinations for employees

Long-term effects of working environment factors as mentioned in the first subsection, include long-term effects of hazardous noise.

For requirements related to health examinations as mentioned in the third subsection, reference is made to Section 3-1, second subsection, litera g and Section 10-11, seventh subsection of the Working Environment Act.

Health-hazardous exposure as mentioned in the fourth subsection, includes exposure to

a)hazardous noise,

b)isocyanates or air containing lead,

c)heightened ambient pressure,

d)asbestos dust,

e)carcinogenic substances.

In order to fulfil the requirement for medical examination, the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision's guidelines regarding physicians in connection with examination of professional divers should be used for participants in manned underwater operations.

To regulations

Re Section 7
Registration of working hours

Working hours as mentioned in the first subsection, mean the actual time worked, including both normal working hours and any overtime.

To follow up working hours as mentioned in the first subsection, entails that the employer has a responsibility for own employees not working more than permitted, cf. Chapter VI of the Framework Regulations.

The working time registers shall be available to the employee representatives, cf. Section 10-7 of the Working Environment Act.

To regulations

CHAPTER III
HEALTH RELATED MATTERS

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