Political Map Of Canada Assignment Notebook

How did Canada develop into the country it is today? Is our form of government the only one available to our country?

Assignment #1: Shipwrecked on Stewart Island

A fun group activity that shows students how varied the world's governments and ideologies can be. The more chaotic the situation on Stewart Island, the better it is to illustrate the complex nature of governing. 

Or . . .
Beginning a Civilization on Mars

Overall Curriculum Expectation Addressed:

C2. Inclusion and Participation: assess ways in which people express their perspectives on issues of 
civic importance and how various perspectives, beliefs, and values are recognized and represented 
in communities in Canada 

It's All about perspective - cartoons by JAmes Chapman

Classroom or individual brainstorming: What is your idea of "Democracy"?

As a class, or individually, students brainstorm what they think are concepts/beliefs/words associated with living in a democracy. The resulting "mind map" can be posted in the classroom, or in a student's notebook, to be revisited throughout that course as issues arise. Questions that can be asked around this assignment: How hard is it to keep your defenition of democracy intact when you are confronted with different situations (i.e. A belief in freedom of speech when confronted with hate speech)? Is Canada's defenition of democracy the same as everyone elses? 

Possible concepts/beliefs/words students may associate with democracy:

  • Freedom of Speech
  • Freedom of Religion
  • Equality
  • Protection of property
  • A law abiding society
  • Slow
  • Expensive
  • Freedom
  • Multiculturalism
The Meaning of the Word Democracy.pdf
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Overall Curriculum Expectations Addressed:

A1. Political Inquiry: use the political inquiry process and the concepts of political thinking when 
investigating issues, events, and developments of civic importance;

A2. Developing Transferable Skills: apply in everyday contexts skills developed through investigations 
related to civics and citizenship education, and identify some careers in which civics and citizenship 
education might be an asset.

B3. Rights and Responsibilities: analyse key rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, 
in both the Canadian and global context, and some ways in which these rights are protected 

Inquiry: What happens when our idea of Democracy is challenged?

The true test of a democracy is when its ideology is tested by events that challenge everything that it stands for. How does a country move on from an event such as the Oslo Massacre ("This Country Beats France" was filmed by Michael Moore before 2011)

Wealth Inequality

Evaluation: What is your ideology?

What do students feel about the nature of humanity? How they see their fellow human beings will set them up for the variety of different forms of government. For a radically different approach to seeing community, check out the Kingdom of Bhutan's system of Gross National Happiness below.
Overall Curriculum Expectations Addressed:

A1. Political Inquiry: use the political inquiry process and the concepts of political thinking when 
investigating issues, events, and developments of civic importance;

A2. Developing Transferable Skills: apply in everyday contexts skills developed through investigations 
related to civics and citizenship education, and identify some careers in which civics and citizenship 
education might be an asset.

B1. Civic Issues, Democratic Values: describe beliefs and values associated with democratic citizenship 
in Canada, and explain how they are related to civic action and to one’s position on civic issues 

Note #1: The Evolution of Democracy

Evolution of Democracy
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Classroom Discussion: Governments around the world


There are over 200 countries in the world - each with their own forms of government that have evolved along very different paths. Listed below are some of the different forms of government, including countries that have adopted their styles of rule. Remember, different combinations of government can exist (i.e. a dictatorship that is also a monarchy).
Types of Government in Your Own Words.pdf
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Why is Canada a Constitutional Monarchy?

Overall Expectations Addressed:

A1. Political Inquiry: use the political inquiry process and the concepts of political thinking when 
investigating issues, events, and developments of civic importance;

A2. Developing Transferable Skills: apply in everyday contexts skills developed through investigations 
related to civics and citizenship education, and identify some careers in which civics and citizenship 
education might be an asset.

B1. Civic Issues, Democratic Values: describe beliefs and values associated with democratic citizenship 
in Canada, and explain how they are related to civic action and to one’s position on civic issues 

B3. Rights and Responsibilities: analyse key rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, 
in both the Canadian and global context, and some ways in which these rights are protected 

Government in Popular Culture - do you see any similarities?

Canadian Democracy and our Constitution

Canada is a very complicated country with a history of parliamentary democracy that stretches back centuries (and includes the histories of North America's First Nations, England and France). In fact, the Canadian Constitution (the foundation - or "rule book" - of the country) is not one document, but a series of written laws and acts, as well as unwritten conventions and traditions that have evolved over time.





What is the Canadian Constitution?

Canadian Constitution
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DYK?

The Dominion Canada was first formed in 1867 by four colonies into the original provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Together, these provinces were joined under Queen Victoria by the British North America Act (now called the Constitution Act, 1867) - you can see a copy of the BNA Act here.

Although Canadians had established their House of Commons and Senate, the country did not achieve full independance until the Statute of Westminster (1931). Canadians still had to petition the British Parliament if they wanted to change their Constitution until 1982.

What is the Statute of Westminster (1931)?:

The Statue of Westminster.pdf
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Note #2: Canadian Democracy - Confederation

Canadian Democracy - Confederation.pdf
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How does Confederation work?
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The Dominion of Canada.pdf
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Overall Expectations Addressed:

B1. Civic Issues, Democratic Values: describe beliefs and values associated with democratic citizenship 
in Canada, and explain how they are related to civic action and to one’s position on civic issues 

B2. Governance in Canada: explain, with reference to a range of issues of civic importance, the roles 
and responsibilities of various institutions, structures, and figures in Canadian governance 

Shipwrecked on Stewart Island:

Shipwrecked on Stewart Island.pdf
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Map of Stewart Island:

Stewart Island Map.pdf
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Ideology Note & Assignment
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Ideology Rubric 2014.pdf
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Anarchy

A condition of lawlessness or political disorder brought about by the absence of governmental authority.


New Orleans after the 2006 Hurricane Katrina; Haiti after the 2010 Earthquake.

Dictatorship

A form of government in which a ruler or small clique wield absolute power (not restricted by a constitution or laws). Also, a system in which the citizens do not possess the right to choose their own leaders. Check out a great video on one dictator here.

Theocracy

A form of government in which a religious leader is recognized as the supreme ruler (Pope, bishops, mullahs, etc).

Communism

A system of government in which the state plans and controls the economy and a single - often authoritarian - party holds power; state controls are imposed with the elimination of private ownership of property or capital while claiming to make progress toward a higher social order in which all goods are equally shared by the people (i.e., a classless society). In a communist society everyone is, theoretically, treated equally.

Democracy

A form of government in which the supreme power is retained by the people, but which is usually exercised indirectly through a system of representation and delegated authority by elected representatives. Remember! Democracy means different things in different countries - some countries call themselves democratic, but are not by Canadian standards.

Republic

A representative democracy in which the Head of State is elected into office (typically called a "president"). People's elected deputies (representatives), not the people themselves, vote on legislation.

Constitutional Monarchy

A system of government in which a monarch (king, queen, prince, duke, etc.) is bound by a constitution whereby his/her rights, duties, and responsibilities are spelled out in written law or by custom. The monarch is not actively involved in policy formation or implementation (i.e., the exercise of sovereign powers by a monarch in a ceremonial capacity); rather, true governmental leadership is carried out by a cabinet and its head - a prime minister, premier, or chancellor - who are drawn from a legislature (parliament).
In 2016 Governor General David Johnston published The Idea of Canada - a collection of letters written to Canadians exploring the uniqueness of Canada. 

In his letter to Deborah Vuylsteke (pps 149-154) the Governor General answers the question "What's a Monarchy For?". This letter provides an opportunity for students to get a firsthand account of the importance and uniqueness of Canada's constitutional monarchy.

Johnston, David. The Idea of Canada​. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2016.

Socialism

A government in which the means of planning, producing, and distributing goods is controlled by a central government that theoretically seeks a more just and equitable distribution of property and labour.

Confederation

A union by compact or treaty between states, provinces, or territories, that creates a central government with certain powers; the states or provinces retain supreme authority over all matters except those delegated to the central government.

- Он открыл жалюзи. - Все еще темно? - спросила Мидж. Но Бринкерхофф не ответил, лишившись дара речи.

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