My Best Teacher Essay For 7th Class Social Lesson

7th Grade Lessons

7th Grade Arts Lesson Plans

Dance Your Heart Out

Length of Time: 1 - 2 Class Periods

This activity will allow students to demonstrate choreography skills, dance skills, and creativity in small groups.

Fairy Tale Fun

Length of Time: Varies depending on grade level and depth of project

In this performing arts lesson, students will rewrite a well-known fairy tale to include a great deal of dialogue and then act out that fairy tale (creation of props is optional as is taping the performance).

Flash Mob Fun

Length of Time: Several Class Periods

In this performing arts lesson, students will work together with a purpose to create and choreograph a dance for a flash mob to make an announcement for the school.

Kwanzaa Art

Length of Time: 30-40 Minutes

Students will discuss the 7 principals of Kwanzaa and then draw pictures of an example of each.

Mini Diorama

Length of Time: Several Class Periods

This visual arts lesson will allow students to share some personal interests in the form of a diorama. Sample rubric included.

Musical Masterpiece

Length of Time: 45-60 Minutes

In this visual arts lesson, learners will express emotion through painting, as elicited by music.

Painter's Tape Art

Length of Time: 40 minutes to 2 hours depending on grade level

This lesson will allow students to practice creating art by marking off what will not be painted. This requires planning prior to mixing the first color.

Paper Mache Zoo

Length of Time: Varies depending on grade level and depth of project

In this visual arts lesson, students will create zoo animals (or any animals) using paper mache. The ‘zoo’ can be displayed in the classroom or in a localized area of the school.

Upside Down Art

Length of Time: 20 minutes to 2 hours depending on grade level

This lesson will allow students to practice creating art from a unique perspective while learning about Michelangelo.

Video Diary

Length of Time: 30 Minutes a Day for Several Weeks

In this performing arts lesson, students will work to create a short video diary to showcase the import parts of their life and edit the video into a 5 minute or less montage using EZVid or similar program.

7th Grade English/Language Arts Lesson Plans

Analogy Creation

Length of Time: About 1 - 2 Class Periods

Students will create analogies using randomly chosen grade-appropriate words.

Controversial Environmental Issues

Length of Time: 2 Class Periods

Students will research and debate multiple topics in the topic of environmental health. The class will take sides on whether they are for or against the controversial issue.

De and Con Notations

Length of Time: About 45 - 60 Minutes

Students work collaboratively to create the denotations and connotations of words.

Debate an Environmental Issue

Length of Time: 30-40 Minutes

Students will read an article about the sale of tropical fish. Students will analyze the information given and discuss their opinion based on facts from the article.

Nothing but the Truth

Length of Time: About five 45 minute sessions

This lesson will allow students to practice reading out loud and determining how point of view affects the action of a story.

Present Perfect Tense

Length of Time: 40 - 50 Minutes

Students will be able to explain clearly the rules on the present perfect tense of verbs as differentiated from the simple present and past tenses.

Reducing Every Day Plastic Use

Length of Time: Multiple Class Periods

Students will research and write a persuasive essay about the effects of plastic in every day use. They will be encouraged to send these letters to officials who could make a difference.

The Classroom Lottery

Length of Time: One of more 45 minute class period

Based on the short story, The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson, the students will be participate in a similar mock classroom drama using a different scenario for the “choosing”, while writing answers to thought-provoking questions.

What Year Did That Happen?

Length of Time: About 2 - 3 Class Periods

Students will practice rewriting and summarizing paragraphs, paraphrasing the information, facts, and other details in a writing sample.

7th Grade Environmental Lesson Plans

Biosphere

Length of Time: 30 - 45 Minutes

This lesson will allow students to create a self sustaining biosphere.

Controversial Environmental Issues

Length of Time: 2 Class Periods

Students will research and debate multiple topics in the topic of environmental health. The class will take sides on whether they are for or against the controversial issue.

Debate an Environmental Issue

Length of Time: 30-40 Minutes

Students will read an article about the sale of tropical fish. Students will analyze the information given and discuss their opinion based on facts from the article.

Earth Window Art

Length of Time: 30 - 45 Minutes

This lesson will allow students to create a replica of the Earth that can also be used as decoration.

Fish or Famine?

Length of Time: 10-15 Minutes

Students will understand food scarcity and unequal distribution through a simple, yet concrete demonstration.

Help a Cause

Length of Time: 30 - 60 Minutes

Students will use recycled materials to create toys for a local shelter.

7th Grade Math Lesson Plans

Box Geometry

Length of Time: 40-50 minutes

Students will learn about using the formulas for the area of squares, rectangles, and triangles to determine how much paint and carpet to purchase for a room.  In addition, they will learn about scale measurements.

Graph Smile

Length of Time: 3 class periods

Pairs of students will survey other students in the school and then graph the results, as well as come to conclusions based on the information. 

Ice Cream Cones, Baseballs, and Cans

Length of Time: 1-2 Class Periods

Students will work in pairs to practice finding the volume of cones, cylinders, and spheres using everyday objects.

Interest-ing Math

Length of Time: 40 - 50 minutes

Students will learn about simple interest and how to calculate the real cost of a loan, credit card, and other types of borrowing.

Numbers By The Book

Length of Time: 45 minutes across 2 to 3 days

This lesson will allow students to show a relationship between numbers and a visual representation in a manner that can be used for younger students.

Order in the Math Class

Length of Time: 1-2 Class Periods

The students will physically review the order of operations.

Prices and Percentages

Length of Time: About 1 - 2 Class Periods

Using a current list of prices for food and clothing, the students will practice math skills related to percentages.

Silent Geometry

Length of Time: About 1 - 2 Class Periods

The students will practice using geometry formulas measuring items in the classroom to find area and volume, radius and circumference, and identify the types of angles.

Take a Vacation

Length of Time: About 45 minutes

The students will plan a vacation for themselves, group of friends, or family, considering the costs involved.

7th Grade P.E. Lesson Plans

Music Movement

Length of Time: 1 class period

The students will move to the music based on its beat, words, tune, and other variables.

PE Immigration

Length of Time: 2-3 Class Periods

The students will research games and activities from other countries to share during a PE class.

Trust Me

Length of Time: 20 - 30 Minutes

This lesson will allow students to practice teamwork and trust building, as well as working on directionality for younger students.

7th Grade Science Lesson Plans

Controversial Environmental Issues

Length of Time: 2 Class Periods

Students will research and debate multiple topics in the topic of environmental health. The class will take sides on whether they are for or against the controversial issue.

Creature Connection

Length of Time: About 2-3 Hours

The student will research three living creatures, write a short report for each, and discover the ecological connections between each.

Debate an Environmental Issue

Length of Time: 30-40 Minutes

Students will read an article about the sale of tropical fish. Students will analyze the information given and discuss their opinion based on facts from the article.

Fish or Famine?

Length of Time: 10-15 Minutes

Students will understand food scarcity and unequal distribution through a simple, yet concrete demonstration.

Glad Scientists

Length of Time: About 3 Hours or More

A pair of students will research a specific scientist from the past and present information to the class and carry out one of his/her experiments.

Reducing Every Day Plastic Use

Length of Time: Multiple Class Periods

Students will research and write a persuasive essay about the effects of plastic in every day use. They will be encouraged to send these letters to officials who could make a difference.

Toothpick Structures

Length of Time: Two 45-minute periods

The students will create a structure which can hold as much as possible using only toothpicks and glue.

7th Grade Social Studies Lesson Plans

A City Saved by a Volcano

Length of Time: 3-4 Class Periods

Students will learn how the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in Italy preserved two Roman towns.

A Return to Ancient Rome

Length of Time: 3-4 Class Periods

Students will research and create a brief power point program about a landmark of Ancient Rome.

Exploring the West

Length of Time: 3 class periods

The lesson will teach the students why there was an expansion to what is now the western half of the United States, as well as the displacement of Native Americans.

Follow the Direction

Length of Time: Two 45-minute periods

Students choose or be assigned a notable person from the past, research and find quotes or speeches written by that person and role play the person in the classroom, reading some of the speech, and/or the quotes, allowing other students to guess who it is.

Help a Cause

Length of Time: 30 - 60 Minutes

Students will use recycled materials to create toys for a local shelter.

History of Hanukkah

Length of Time: 30-40 Minutes

Students will read a passage about the history of Hanukkah and “talk to the text” to understand the story better. Students will answer questions individually and then with a partner to understand the text better.

It’s a Wonder – Filled World

Length of Time: About 2 Class Periods

Students will learn about the list of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World compiled by the ancient Greeks.

Kwanzaa Socratic Seminar

Length of Time: 30 - 40 Minutes Each

Students will discuss the cultural roots of Kwanzaa and analyze why the holiday has been brought to the United States.

President vs. President

Length of Time: About 3-5 class periods

Each student will research a past deceased president, review their life, speeches, quotes, term in office, etc., and use it to run for President versus another past President.

Presidential Politics

Length of Time: About 2-4 Class Periods

Students will research a past president’s opinions, promises and goals discussed prior to their election and compare/contrast them during their years in office.

The Articles of Confederation

Length of Time: 2 to 3 class periods

The students will research the “first rules” of the United States, the Articles of Confederation.

What Year Did That Happen?

Length of Time: About 45 - 90 Minutes

Students will research several historic events in history concentrating on the years they occurred and attempt to create pneumonic devices to help match the correct year to the event.

This section is filled with a variety of lessons for 7th grade teaching and learning. The lessons span multiple subjects and objectives. Feel free to enjoy and share these lessons as they can be easily integrated into an existing curriculum. Our 7th grade lesson plan section will continuously grow as more teachers from our Teacher.org community share their work. If you have lessons that you would like to share, please contact us. You have the power to inspire our future.


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For seven years, I was a writing teacher. Yes, I was certified to teach the full spectrum of English language arts—literature, grammar and usage, speech, drama, and so on—but my absolute favorite, the thing I loved doing the most, was teaching students how to write.

Most of the material on this site is directed at all teachers. I look for and put together resources that would appeal to any teacher who teaches any subject. That practice will continue for as long as I keep this up. But over the next year or so, I plan to also share more of what I know about teaching students to write. Although I know many of the people who visit here are not strictly English language arts teachers, my hope is that these posts will provide tons of value to those who are, and to those who teach all subjects, including writing.

So let’s begin with argumentative writing, or persuasive writing, as many of us used to call it. This overview will be most helpful to those who are new to teaching writing, or teachers who have not gotten good results with the approach you have taken up to now. I don’t claim to have the definitive answer on how to do this, but the method I share here worked pretty well for me, and it might do the same for you. If you are an experienced English language arts teacher, you probably already have a system for teaching this skill that you like. Then again, I’m always interested in how other people do the things I can already do; maybe you’re curious like that, too.

Before I start, I should note that what I describe in this post is a fairly formulaic style of essay writing. It’s not exactly the 5-paragraph essay, but it definitely builds on that model. I strongly believe students should be shown how to move past those kinds of structures into a style of writing that’s more natural and fitting to the task and audience, but I also think they should start with something that’s pretty clearly organized.

So here’s how I teach argumentative essay writing.

Step 1: Watch How It’s Done

One of the most effective ways to improve student writing is to show them mentor texts, examples of excellent writing within the genre students are about to attempt themselves. Ideally, this writing would come from real publications and not be fabricated by me in order to embody the form I’m looking for. (Although most experts on writing instruction employ some kind of mentor text study, the person I learned it from best was Katie Wood Ray in her book Study Driven). Since I want the writing to be high quality and the subject matter to be high interest, I might choose pieces like Jessica Lahey’s Students Who Lose Recess Are the Ones Who Need it Most and David Bulley’s School Suspensions Don’t Work.

I would have students read these texts, compare them, and find places where the authors used evidence to back up their assertions. I would ask students which author they feel did the best job of influencing the reader, and what suggestions they would make to improve the writing. I would also ask them to notice things like stories, facts and statistics, and other things the authors use to develop their ideas. Later, as students work on their own pieces, I would likely return to these pieces to show students how to execute certain writing moves.

Step 2: Informal Argument, Freestyle

Although many students might need more practice in writing an effective argument, many of them are excellent at arguing in person. To help them make this connection, I would have them do some informal debate on easy, high-interest topics. An activity like This or That (one of the classroom icebreakers I talked about last year) would be perfect here: I read a statement like “Women have the same opportunities in life as men.” Students who agree with the statement move to one side of the room, and those who disagree move to the other side. Then they take turns explaining why they are standing in that position. This ultimately looks a little bit like a debate, as students from either side tend to defend their position to those on the other side.

Every class of students I have ever had, from middle school to college, has loved loved LOVED this activity. It’s so simple, it gets them out of their seats, and for a unit on argument, it’s an easy way to get them thinking about how the art of argument is something they practice all the time.

Step 3: Informal Argument, Not so Freestyle

Once students have argued without the support of any kind of research or text, I would set up a second debate; this time with more structure and more time to research ahead of time. I would pose a different question, supply students with a few articles that would provide ammunition for either side, then give them time to read the articles and find the evidence they need.

Next, we’d have a Philosophical Chairs debate (learn about this in my discussion strategies post), which is very similar to “This or That,” except students use textual evidence to back up their points, and there are a few more rules. Here they are still doing verbal argument, but the experience should make them more likely to appreciate the value of evidence when trying to persuade.

Before leaving this step, I would have students transfer their thoughts from the discussion they just had into something that looks like the opening paragraph of a written argument: A statement of their point of view, plus three reasons to support that point of view. This lays the groundwork for what’s to come.

Step 4: Introduction of the Performance Assessment

Next I would show students their major assignment, the performance assessment that they will work on for the next few weeks. What does this look like? It’s generally a written prompt that describes the task, plus the rubric I will use to score their final product.

Anytime I give students a major writing assignment, I let them see these documents very early on. In my experience, I’ve found that students appreciate having a clear picture of what’s expected of them when beginning a writing assignment. At this time, I also show them a model of a piece of writing that meets the requirements of the assignment. Unlike the mentor texts we read on day 1, this sample would be something teacher-created (or an excellent student model from a previous year) to fit the parameters of the assignment.

Step 5: Building the Base

Before letting students loose to start working on their essays, I make sure they have a solid plan for writing. I would devote at least one more class period to having students consider their topic for the essay, drafting a thesis statement, and planning the main points of their essay in a graphic organizer.

I would also begin writing my own essay on a different topic. This has been my number one strategy for teaching students how to become better writers. Using a document camera or overhead projector, I start from scratch, thinking out loud and scribbling down my thoughts as they come. When students see how messy the process can be, it becomes less intimidating for them. They begin to understand how to take the thoughts that are stirring around in your head and turn them into something that makes sense in writing.

For some students, this early stage might take a few more days, and that’s fine: I would rather spend more time getting it right at the pre-writing stage than have a student go off willy-nilly, draft a full essay, then realize they need to start over. Meanwhile, students who have their plans in order will be allowed to move on to the next step.

Step 6: Writer’s Workshop

The next seven to ten days would be spent in writer’s workshop, where I would start class with a mini-lesson about a particular aspect of craft. I would show them how to choose credible, relevant evidence, how to skillfully weave evidence into an argument, how to consider the needs of an audience, and how to correctly cite sources. Once each mini-lesson was done, I would then give students the rest of the period to work independently on their writing. During this time, I would move around the room, helping students solve problems and offering feedback on whatever part of the piece they are working on. I would encourage students to share their work with peers and give feedback at all stages of the writing process.

If I wanted to make the unit even more student-centered, I would provide the mini-lessons in written or video format and let students work through them at their own pace, without me teaching them. (To learn more about this approach, read my post on self-paced learning).

As students begin to complete their essays, the mini-lessons would focus more on matters of style and usage. I almost never bother talking about spelling, punctuation, grammar, or usage until students have a draft that’s pretty close to done. Only then do we start fixing the smaller mistakes.

Step 7: Final Assessment

Finally, the finished essays are handed in for a grade. At this point, I’m pretty familiar with each student’s writing and have given them verbal (and sometimes written) feedback throughout the unit; that’s why I make the writer’s workshop phase last so long. I don’t really want students handing in work until they are pretty sure they’ve met the requirements to the best of their ability. I also don’t necessarily see “final copies” as final; if a student hands in an essay that’s still really lacking in some key areas, I will arrange to have that student revise it and resubmit for a higher grade.

 

So that’s it. If you haven’t had a lot of success teaching students to write persuasively, and if the approach outlined here is different from what you’ve been doing, give it a try. And let’s keep talking: Use the comments section below to share your techniques or ask questions about the most effective ways to teach argumentative writing.

 


Want this unit ready-made?

If you’re a writing teacher in grades 7-12 and you’d like a classroom-ready unit like the one described above, including mini-lessons, sample essays, and a library of high-interest online articles to use for gathering evidence, take a look at my Argumentative Writing unit. Just click on the image below and you’ll be taken to a page where you can read more and see a detailed preview of what’s included.


 

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